Drill to Take a Divot After the Ball

Here’s a Drill to Take a Divot After the Ball How to take a divot after the ball is a cornerstone to pure ball striking, but it’s one of...

Here’s a Drill to Take a Divot After the Ball

How to take a divot after the ball is a cornerstone to pure ball striking, but it’s one of the most difficult aspects of clean contact to master. It’s difficult to do from a technique standpoint, but most of the difficulty probably comes from our brain getting in the way. We always tend to bail out or flip our wrists at the last moment because we’re afraid of grounding the club. Almost always that results in the exact problem we have been working to avoid. The best way to beat the mental side getting in the way is repetition. Here are a few keys to keep in mind, and check out the video below from GolfDigest.com; it’s a great drill.

  • Forward shaft lean: Make sure that the shaft is leaning forward at impact. If you want to take a divot in front of the ball, the arc of the club needs to bottom out through the ball. This is where our head gets in the way of things because we tend to panic in the down swing out of fear that we’ll hit the shot fat. So, to compensate we’ll flip our wrists, which is what will actually cause a fat shot. Hold off releasing the club early. Practice holding that lag by starting your wrist hinge immediately in the back swing and take 3/4 swings. That’s a drill Ian Poulter uses to improve his ball contact.
  • Weight forward: On the downswing you have to make sure you’re moving your weight onto your front foot. If you’re sitting on your back foot, then the swing will naturally bottom out behind the ball regardless of how much lag you’ve built and how long you have held off the release.
  • Take it straight back: To set up a smooth downswing, we have to start with the back swing. Bring the club back as if someone directly behind the ball is pulling your club straight back like a string is attached to the head. This should help eliminate too flat of a swing which can result in a “sweeping” motion, it will increase the available contact area on the clubface, and it will keep you from digging the heel of the club into the turf and nobody want’s the hook that comes from that.

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