Snell Get Sum Review: Best Ball Under $30?

Snell Get Sum Golf Ball Review: Another Case of Snell Golf Shaking Things Up Snell might have created a problem for themselves. While they were off creating a ball...

Snell Get Sum Golf Ball Review: Another Case of Snell Golf Shaking Things Up

Snell might have created a problem for themselves. While they were off creating a ball at a mid-price that mops the floor with most premium mark-ups, Snell forgot tht they were trying to run a business. $31.99 for a Pro V1 fighter? That’s insanity!

Look at TaylorMade — forget that adidas is trying to cut off that dead foot — you’re supposed to trickle out minor improvements while charging an increasing price, Snell. How will anything survive in the Snell golf ball lineup with the My Tour Ball taking names and kicking ass? There’s no way they could make something cheaper than the My Tour Ball that’s still worth buying for its performance.

Of course it was dumb of us to assume that the Snell My Tour Ball was a one-time fluke. It wasn’t. Snell Golf didn’t just set out to make the best ball on the market, they’re setting out to make the best ball at every tier in which they’re competing. The Snell Get Sum golf ball is an example of this price point domination.

Snell Get Sum Construction

 

Snell Get Sum Review: Driver & Long Irons

The Snell Get Sum is a two-piece ball built to feel soft and reduce spin on long clubs. The Snell Get Sum feels as advertised. It doesn’t fall into the sponge category, it doesn’t feel like hitting a teddy bear with a driver, it doesn’t feel like it belongs between to graham crackers and a piece of chocolate like the Titleist DT TrusSoft does, but it’s soft. For a mid-to-high handicap player, the feel of the Snell Get Sum is . . . comforting. Every strike, regardless of placement on the face, has that squishy, compressing feeling that leaves  you feeling like even toe balls were somewhat within the vicinity of the sweet spot.

Snell accomplished their goal of minimizing spin. Your slices that hit the tree twenty yards up and 30 yards to the right of the tee box won’t be cured by the Snell Get Sum golf ball — this isn’t Merlin’s golf ball. It does, however, have that safe, low trajectory indicative of low-compression, low-spin golf balls, and that means more opportunity to keep it in the fairway. Don’t expect those high looping draws, but then again, if you can hit those, you’re not in the market for the Get Sum.

Snell Get Sum Snell Logo Watermark Drop Shadow

 

Short Irons & Wedges

What’s the trade-off for low spin off the tee? No spin around the green. Most low-compression, low-spin balls that are squishy off the tee turn into unresponsive blocks of wood when a wedge is put to them, but surprisingly that isn’t the case with the Snell Get Sum golf balls. Don’t expect zip back, the best you will see is a hop and stop, but most frequently the Get Sum needed a handful of hops with minimal roll out.

Conclusion: Snell Get Sum Review

Considering the company that the Snell Get Sum holds at $20.99 per dozen — I’m talking cheaper than Bridgestone e Series balls — it’s once again remarkable what this online-only brand is doing. Dean Snell threw a flaming bag on the big brands’ doorsteps with the My Tour Ball, and now the Snell Get Sum is goading them to stamp the bag out . . . the next move is yours, big brands.

Snell Get Sum waterrmark drop shadow

 

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