Miura New Wedge Series Review

Only Miura would find a way to call something several years old "new", but it's still very good!

Miura New Wedge Series Review: Not so New, but Still Good

The Miura New Wedge Series. What’s so new about? Does it take wedge tech to the next level? Do you have to charge it? Actually it’s not a new product offering in the slightest. It’s called the New Wedge Series because it has a redesigned sole and bounce profile over the “old” series. In fact, the Miura New Wedge Series is several years old, a dinosaur by industry standards, but by Miura’s standards it’s a mere toddler. So why review a club that debuted so long ago? Because it’s Miura. We’ve been conditioned to believe that introducing one or more new clubs a season implies constant innovation, but we all really know it’s just a money grab — check out the Club Champion driver fitting experience — and Miura makes clubs that stand the test of time, so that’s the purpose of reviewing the Miura New Wedge Series, to see if it is standing the test of time.

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First Impressions

Well, the Miura name and logo is stamped on it, so it’s got that going for it, but the New Wedge Series, oddly enough, has very classic lines. I’m not complaining. It has a nice, rounded toe, and a shorter profile from heel to toe. The finish is a clean satin chrome, it doesn’t have a crazy cavity back, and the grind is simple. It’s forged and without a lot of bells and whistles . . . in this day and age of equipment “technology”, it’s actually refreshing to see something that gets back to the basics.

Performance

First off, the purpose of the Miura New Wedge Series is to cater to players who fall into the odd numbers of wedge loft. Not everyone wants nor does everyone fit into 52, 56, and 60 degree sets. Miura sent me lofts of 51, 55, and 59 degree lofts to test, but before we get into that, take a look at the specs below.

Material: Forged Low Carbon Mild Steel
Lofts: 51, 55, and 59 degrees
Standard 63.5 degree lie angles
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold
Grip: PURE Grip

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Starting with the 51 degree Miura New Wedge Series wedge (sounds a tad redundant), I’m in love with this wedge. It has the right amount of weight so that it gives you confidence of feeling like you can put a solid strike on the ball but not too heavy that you worry about chunking it six inches under the ball. Launch is solid, not “hot”, but solid, and the ball flight is high.

Thos are all the things you say about a wedge, right? Right. The 51 and 55 degree Miura New Wedge Series is predictable, it’s safe, and it’s consistent, and that’s where I want to emphasize the target market for these clubs. What kind of club cuts through rough and tough lies with ease and seems to make up for mishits in the fairway? A club that’s meant for casual players. The word “forged” gets tossed around a lot, and people always tend to assume that forged means it’s only for the best players who demand the utmost feeling. Sorry, that’s not the case, and these wedges are a good example of that.

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The Miura New Wedge Series are solid, but they don’t have the feel of a players wedge like a Titleist Vokey. With the 51 and 55 degree wedges, the launch and ball flight is great, but they don’t offer a ton of spin on the green. That’s not a bad thing! More people should be concerned with pinpoint accuracy over the jaw-dropping ripcord effect when the ball lands on the green. The Miura New Wedge Series offers that accuracy.

With all of that in mind, the 59 degree didn’t really make a whole lot of sense to me. It had the same feeling of the 51 and 55 degree which wasn’t enough for a precision instrument. If a player doesn’t demand that type of control and versatility from super close lies, chances are they shouldn’t be playing anything above a 57 degree wedge to begin with. So I would have liked more responsiveness from the highest loft available in the New Wedge Series.

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Final Thoughts

The Miura New Wedge Series won’t appeal to scratch golfers — Miura has wedges that will — but it can give mid-handicappers the feeling offered in harder to use wedges with much more forgiveness; that’s thanks to the mild carbon steel.

If there’s one thing that the Miura New Wedge Series can hang its hat on, it’s distance control. The adjustment period with these was non-existent. They really give the player the confidence to attack the pin on every approach.

The Miura New Wedge Series comes in right hand only lofts of 51, 53, 55, 57, and 59 degrees. Find out more on Miura’s site.

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